Bossing myself

You may recognize this pattern – it’s Vogue 8926, and I sent it off to Sally for our Sew Bossy exchange. I was more than a little envious of her final piece and had meant to sew one up for myself ever since I laid eyes on hers!

crabandbee.com | Vogue 8926

crabandbee.com | Vogue 8926

Based on my own fit quirks, I made the following adjustments to fit my broad/square shoulders and small bust:

  • small bust adjustment, removing 2″ total from the bust
  • square shoulder adjustment

I also lengthened the ties by nearly double and finished the sleeve hems by hand.

The fabric was a gift from Sanae and I made my own binding. I waffled between white and grey binding more than I’d care to admit. Grey won, as per usual!

crabandbee.com | Vogue 8926 detail

What I like, nay, love about this top is it’s a very simple sew (aside from two pivoted seams) with high style impact. I haven’t seen too many other patterns out there like this one and wouldn’t mind having one or two more of these in my wardrobe. Wouldn’t it be great in white as an alternative to a classic buttoned shirt?

crabandbee.com | Vogue 8926

I made this top about a month ago, before I cut myself off from any more non-wedding sewing. In a series of escalating (sewing) dares, I found myself making a bra/corset contraption for my sister. My sister possesses a similar figure to mine – broad upper back, smaller bust and rib cage – all of which make strapless designs creep towards the waist. After extensive shopping, all she could find were strapless bras that unflatteringly squeezed her back in order to stay up. I decided to create her undergarment as a time-saving device so we could continue fitting the bodice. I converted the dress bodice pattern, which is bustier-style, into a bra pattern and reduced the ease dramatically as I was using powernet.

As someone who is completely satisfied with bralettes, I was grateful for the bra-making craze that’s swept through the blogging community. I surprised myself by having a basic knowledge of the supplies – I must have absorbed that by osmosis! Big thanks to Cloth Habit’s fantastic bra-making sewalong, too.

crabandbee.com | bridal undergarment

There’s lots of things I would do differently now that I’ve tried my hand at it, like make it longer, lowering the bridge, using sheet foam instead of molded cups, etc, but I think it’s going to work for our purposes.

Next up, constructing the bodice. Wish me luck!

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60 thoughts on “Bossing myself

  1. okay, i need this jacket in my life, asap!! i love your version and Sally’s version too, nice soft linen with contrasting binding. im sew going to copy this!

  2. That jacket is spectacular! May have to add it to my list… I had been eyeing the jacket in V1440, but now I’m torn.

    The longline bra you’ve made for your sister is seriously impressive!

  3. Suits you perfectly. Gorgeous colour way too. I do like the shorter version as well – that would definitely be lovely in a crisp white. Good luck with the Dress Project!

  4. I love this on you Morgan, so good as usual! And I always admire your dedication to making all the adjustments to make it perfect for you. I’ve got this pattern too and it’s one that I often take out and consider but think the pattern art of line drawings only with no views on an actual person puts me off. Thanks for the reminder that it’s a great pattern!

  5. This looks FANTASTIC on you! Love the fabric 🙂 and also, random, but your hair looks amazing and I’m jealous lol

    1. Thanks, Sally! Twinsies! My sis takes my pictures and she’s always good about fluffing my hair into some awesome configuration.

  6. The sentence “I decided to create her undergarment as a time-saving device…” is perhaps one of the most hilarious things I’ve ever read! I can’t wait to see your sister’s dress, I hope we get to see a few wedding shots 🙂 Also your fabric selection on the shirt is spectacular!

    1. Ugh I know, I was writing that and thinking how crazy it sounded! But once you get a taste of clothing that fits, it’s hard to stand by and idly watch someone else’s fitting misfortunes. I think I just need to ask Sanae to buy double yardage for me whenever she shops, because she’s clearly got the magic touch!

  7. Wow! I love this top. It’s funny how you don’t pay attention to a pay sometimes until someone makes up a stella version! It’s going to be on my mind now.

  8. This looks very stylish! I think your choice of the grey binding was spot on, it looks perfect with your fabric.

  9. This jacket is wonderful… the fabric is soooo beautiful – is it linen or a linen cotton blend?- I love it! looks airy and fresh – perfect for summer!

  10. Yes! This is fantastic! I would totally wear this just as a top in the cooler months. You definitely got me to pay attention to this pattern that I otherwise would have totally overlooked. But no surprise there – you have great taste! And the longline bra looks lovely! Cant wait to see the finished look on the bride!

    1. I have this feeling that your cooler months are my spring (if not summer)! I’ve been only wearing this as a top so far 🙂 And thank you! It’s nerve-wracking creating such a special piece, but I *think* we’re on the right track!!

  11. I love this jacket, and especially love the detail of the bias trim. Gorgeous work! And the bra looks amazing! Sometimes making it your self really does save time and frustration. Good luck on the wedding sewing!

  12. That is a really cool jacket! I love the drape lapel and the bias trim you used. I am on a jacket kick at the moment. I have never made one before but this winter I am obsessed with the idea. This pattern will be getting added to the list of potential makes I think.

    1. Thanks, Kat! I think this pattern would look amazing in a double-faced wool or something heavier for a warmer jacket. It’s a quick sew, too! Happy jacket-making 🙂

  13. Morgan, you’re on a roll! Firstly, that top is gorgeous and the grey was definitely the perfect choice for bias binding!
    Secondly, kick butt with the wedding sewing!

  14. This is so cool! It’s really your style! And I LOVE the idea of a white version as an alternative to a plain white shirt.

    Good luck with the wedding sewing! I’m really excited for you!!!

    1. Thanks, Sonja! I’m restraining myself from making up a white version in the interest of finishing up the dress… it’s tough!

  15. I think you have really put the cool factor in this jacket…the pattern envelope is not appealing and I would never have imagined it could look so edgy. You have a great eye for design lines.

    1. Thanks, Katherine! I really can’t tell if I like a pattern until I see the line drawings, which has ultimately been a useful habit to get into. It’s nice that I got to see how it looked on Sally first, too!

  16. I love this jacket/top and the fabric you chose! I bet it goes with everything, and a great alternative to a plain shirt. You are blowing my mind with all this wedding dress (and undergarment) sewing – must be quite an undertaking, but it sounds like you are doing really well!

    1. Thank you, Heather! Like any unfamiliar project, it’ll be hard to feel like I’m doing really well until I’m finished – there are just so many unknowns! But I’m just trying to relax and enjoy the learning (and take heart in the fact we have a backup plan!)

  17. This jacket/top is gorgeous. I’ve been eyeing off the tessuti tokyo and newly released Sydney and this almost looks like a blend of the two. I’m slowly building up a contemporary art gallery appropriate work wardrobe again and this is going on the list. Though I’m curious, would the bust adjustment really be that crucial on this pattern?

    1. Thanks! Funny you mention it, I was considering mentioning that it looked like something I’d expect to see on a patron or employee of an art museum! (I spent a lot of time interning in museums as a college student).

      I think the shoulder adjustment was the most crucial, but I’ve found that even loose garments look much better on me with an SBA.

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